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Chess Movies 2
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Titel: Chess Movies 2
Auteur: Pandolfini
Uitgever: Russell Enterprises
Jaartal: 2011
Taal: Engels
Aantal pagina's:   200
Verkoopprijs:   Ä 17.95
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Commentaar:

Chess Movies represents a new idea in the Pandolfini Chess Library series. It offers instructional material with every single move diagrammed and explained. Thus a chessboard and pieces are not needed to follow through. This makes it possible to rely solely on the book itself, as one would with a text on tactics and problems, without having to set up the positions. It's almost as if one is sitting in a movie theater, watching the film roll by, with the narrative carried along by subtitles. But whereas a film seen in the theater just keeps going, here you can "stop" the action and take time thinking about what you're seeing and what's being explained to you, as if you were home watching on your own DVD.

In this second volume of the Chess Movies series, The Means and Ends , the enthusiast is presented with an assortment of 64 precisely finessed and well-executed endgames from the oeuvres of the world's foremost chess gladiators. Lasker, Rubinstein, Capablanca, Karpov, Fischer, Anand and other chess gods, offered in stratagem, maneuver, and insightful simplification, provide the subject matter for this newest collection of chess cinema. Taking off from volume 1 of the Chess Movies series, the present volume shows the other end of successful chess play, the actual final moves of winning endgames. Read and watch on, and may all of you play happily ever after.

About the author

Chess Master Bruce Pandolfini has been one of the most popular chess writers in the world for more than four decades. He has written on all aspects of the game and is also considered one of the premier chess instructors in the United States.

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Introduction

In the first book of the Chess Moviesģ series, the opening was featured. The material consisted of games finishing in nine moves or fewer. The games hinged on traps or surprising ways to exploit blunders and inexact moves. In this second offering of the series, the focus is on the endgame. Like in Chess Moviesģ 1: Quick Tricks , all the examples in Chess Moviesģ 2: The Means and Ends are drawn from actual play. But there's more to it.

Arranged in chronological order from 1789 to 2007, the endings contained herein are not merely the conclusions of real games. Each illustration terminates in a position that is checkmate or on the verge of checkmate. Additionally intriguing are the players responsible for the victories. For the most part the games have been played by the best players in the world, often against each other. Here we can relive the final moves of some of the most exciting battles of all time. Indeed, among the inclusions are positions drawn from classic world championship matches. They underscore a great truth: that even the very best players can fall for checkmate. We can watch, for instance, how Alekhine cornered Capablanca in a hopeless pin (example 18) or the way Smyslov set up Botvinnik, luring him into a devilish snare where checkmate could not be averted (example 27).

Although such examples, some drawn from rapid contests, often revolve around tactical play, we still get to see strategic endgame principles put to good use. Whether the win is achieved by a rook on the seventh rank, the better positioned king, the advance of a dangerous passed pawn, or the constrictive power of a more centralized queen, most of the wins accomplished herein are brought about by the timely interplay of strategy and tactics. But judge for yourself, and while you're at it, sit back and enjoy the show.

Bruce Pandolfini

New York, NY

April 2011

Content:
005 Introduction

006 (1) Philidor vs. Wilson, 1789

009 (2) LaBourdonnais vs. McDonnell, 1834

012 (3) McDonnell vs. LaBourdonnais, 1834

015 (4) Staunton vs. Cochrane, 1842

018 (5) Staunton vs. Williams, 1851

021 (6) Morphy vs. Thompson, 1859

024 (7) Zukertort vs. Anderssen, 1866

027 (8) Steinitz vs. Anderssen, 1866

030 (9) Steinitz vs. Zukertort, 1872

033 (10) Lasker vs. Schiffers, 1896

036 (11) Spielmann vs. Nimzowitsch, 1905

039 (12) Rubinstein vs. Chigorin, 1906

042 (13) Rubinstein vs. Salwe, 1906

045 (14) Lasker vs. Tarrasch, 1908

048 (15) Janowski vs. Capablanca, 1916

051 (16) Euwe vs. Von Hartingsvelt, 1922

054 (17) Filipcic vs. Lasker, 1924

057 (18) Capablanca vs. Alekhine, 1927

060 (19) Bolgoljubow vs. Alekhine, 1929

063 (20) Levinfish vs. Romanovsky, 1933

066 (21) Keres vs. Stahlberg, 1939

069 (22) Botvinnik vs. Bronstein, 1951

071 (23) Smyslov vs. Keres, 1953

073 (24) Borisenko vs. Simagin, 1955

076 (25) Geller vs. Radulescu, 1956

079 (26) Petrosian vs. Trifunovic, 1957

082 (27) Smyslov vs. Botvinnik, 1958

085 (28) Mednis vs. Fischer, 1958

088 (29) Botvinnik vs. Dueckstein, 1958

091 (30) Botvinnik vs. Raizman, 1958

094 (31) Polugaevsky vs. Szilagyi, 1960

097 (32) Fischer vs. Petrosian, 1961

100 (33) Reshevsky vs. Fischer, 1964

102 (34) Fischer vs. Witczek, 1964

105 (35) Botvinnik vs. Smyslov, 1964

107 (36) Fischer vs. Durao, 1966

110 (37) Letelier vs. Smyslov, 1967

113 (38) Karpov vs. Byrne, 1971

116 (39) Larsen vs. Fischer, 1971

119 (40) Karpov vs. Mecking, 1971

122 (41) Hamann vs. Gligoric, 1972

125 (42) Karpov vs. Pomar, 1974

128 (43) Beliavsky vs. Sveshnikov, 1974

131 (44) Rizvonov vs. Kasparov, 1975

134 (45) Kortschnoi vs. Karpov, 1978

137 (46) Arnasson vs. Kasparov, 1980

140 (47) Larsen vs. Kasparov, 1983

143 (48) Rogers vs. Kortschnoi, 1986

146 (49) Ivanchuk vs. Ivanovic, 1988

149 (50) Beliavsky vs. Adams, 1989

152 (51) Anand vs. Kamsky, 1990

155 (52) Adams vs. Anand, 1992

158 (53) Van Wely vs. Anand, 1992

161 (54) Kamsky vs. Kramnik, 1992

164 (55) Topalov vs. Kasparov, 1994

167 (56) Krasenkow vs. Anand, 1996

170 (57) Kramnik vs. Van Wely, 1998

173 (58) Topalov vs. Piket, 1998

176 (59) Karpov vs. Anand, 1998

179 (60) Petursson vs. Anand, 2000

182 (61) Kasparov vs. Shirov, 2001

185 (62) Carlsen vs. Trygstad, 2003

188 (63) Anand vs. Morozevich, 2007

191 (64) Carlsen vs. Shirov, 2008

194 Some Endgame Advice and Observations

198 Type of Mate or Principal Forces

199 Player Index

200 Concept Themes






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